Land Rover Series One Club
If you can see this message, you're not getting to see all the wonderful content on this website... why not REGISTER for our forum and get access to so much more?

Author Topic: New member  (Read 430 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

June 23, 2020 - 17:55
Read 430 times

Offline 9957

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: Edinburgh
My name is Paul, from Edinburgh, I have just purchased a 1951 series 1 , needing a lot of restoration, the chassis is in poor condition, Using your chassis information tool , it was manufactured between August 1950 and July 1951, should I dip and strip and repair if possible,  or go down the route of a Heritage chassis, Without seeing the chassis I accept itís hard to comment, but I would love a little guidance which might be preferable
Membership no 9957
Thank you

June 23, 2020 - 18:38
Reply #1

Offline Mark Edmunds

  • LRSOC Member
  • Brakes sorted, what's next...
  • Location: Leicestershire, UK
Paul


Welcome to the fold...here you will find a lot of bleating, hopefully great free advice and also some help with hard to find parts...


My humble advice (I have a later but "better looking" 86", so my advice perhaps should be studiously ignored) on your chassis is if you know it needs a lot of TLC, the best way to properly assess it is I am afraid to strip off everything from it, then have it shot blasted. Various parts are freely available for the chassis, although the best supplier for chassis parts, Dale and Carl Radford (on the suppliers list to Members on this website) are apparently starting to wind down making chassis parts. Only by seeing the chassis without its grime, paint, rust and bump stops will you see what it might entail if you decide to patch it up properly.
It may be that the cost of purchasing a new Galvanised one from Richards Chassis (see Legend LRSOC Club magazine for details) is more expensive than if you can do the welding yourself to the original chassis or have a reliable welder at a fair price do it. Advantage of keeping the original chassis is that you may well salvage the important factory stamped chassis number, which will be lost if you change it for a new chassis...


Your decision, and the first of many...decide what your budget is, timescale that you have before you can not bear not to drive it, and overall whether or not you are aiming for a show pony concours competition winning trailer queen, or if you want a ratter that is fun to drive on and off road without worrying about paintwork, or more importantly whether it is mechanically sound and safe!


Good luck and enjoy!


Mark

June 23, 2020 - 20:02
Reply #2

Offline 9957

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: Edinburgh
Thank you for taking the time to reply, I think my gut reaction is to keep and repair, It will be driven ,not to be a show pony
Cheers Paul

June 23, 2020 - 20:10
Reply #3

Offline Mark Edmunds

  • LRSOC Member
  • Brakes sorted, what's next...
  • Location: Leicestershire, UK
Paul -


That was my decision too - I am not saying that I am right, just that this Club has a very broad Membership and each and every one has made their own valid decision as to what they want to do...you may well find that the rear cross member and dumb irons at the front need replacement, as well as the odd outrigger, and in my case the chassis has holed underneath where the rear bump stops are fitted.  I decided to also have my chassis hot dipped galvanised and I also had it sprayed internally and externally with Waxoil.


Go well and enjoy your quest!


Mark

June 23, 2020 - 22:21
Reply #4

Offline Landie Les Moderator

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: Sussex, UK
Hello and welcome. I agree with Mark, if you can repair it yourself, I am sure you could do it cheaper than splashing out on a new chassis. Getting it shot blast and seeing what you have left, is how I would go and have done on my vehicles. Radfords and Richard chassis both supply chassis parts, which can make the job of rebuilding easier. Some say get a galv one it will last longer, guess it depends on how long you are planning to live!


June 23, 2020 - 23:05
Reply #5

Offline msm80

  • LRSOC & LR Register Member
  • RAF1952 80"-1948 80"-1951 80" & Co-pilot Finlay
  • Location: Dorset, UK
Hi Paul
As per previous  comments I agree entirely and bid you welcome.

Iím currently near finishing a June 51 80Ē and the last one I did recently was also another slightly earlier example. In both cases they were stuck rebuilds but luckily the chassis were sound in each case with previous owners having done much of the dirty work!

However Iíd advise fixing body parts and running gear to a well prepped original is always preferable if you can possibly save what you have. While a brand new chassis might last for decades and be a source of comfort if you are hoping to own your pride and joy for at least 40 yrs maybe, those that have undergone the trials and tribulations of fitting up with repaired or new body panels inevitably spend a great deal of time and grief in doing so. In most cases an original body goes on back nicely to the chassis from which it was originally built such that door fits, wing alignments and also suspension parts are a straightforward refit.

Iím not saying a complete new build car is a none starter or a reproduced car but they do raise the bar of restoration to quite a high level requiring a lot of skill and patience to carry off well, so my advice too is try to stick with what you have and also preserve the originality you have. This all assumes of course youíve not ended up with a literal basket case or a car that had completely broken its back beyond total recovery.

Good luck and welcome to the flock!
Malcolm
My Co-Pilot in the 80  :  )
Are we there yet!!

Area Rep Dorset

June 23, 2020 - 23:18
Reply #6

Offline Dollar Bill

  • LRSOC & LR Register Member
  • Location: Clackmannanshire, Scotland
Hi Paul


There are quite a lot of members spread over Scotland.


Maybe you will have your restoration completed in time for our planned October outing :tic: ;D :tic:


http://www.lrsoc.com/forum/index.php?topic=39297.msg307617#msg307617


Could well be some other vehicles than Series Ones attending any way.


Hope to see you and your vehicle some time.


regards


Denton

June 25, 2020 - 08:26
Reply #7

Offline 9957

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: Edinburgh
Thank you all for my welcome, it is much appreciated, your advise regarding keeping the chassis will be heeded, the restoration probably wonít start till end of July, so October sadly wonít be possible, when I purchased the vehicle it came with two boxes of spares (about 4 feet sq each 1) , when I say came , I still have to hire a van and Pick them up, I thought I would photograph each piece as we loaded, and any we donít require would offer to club members.
The vehicle does not have its original petrol engine, it has been replaced with a diesel of unknown origins yet ,if replacement is required, please give me suggestions, or is this subjective, my apologies for delayed response
Cheers Paul

June 25, 2020 - 10:59
Reply #8

Offline Monkeypin

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: South Devon, UK
I'd hang on to any spares until you have finished the job you may well sell something by mistake. A popular engine swap is a 2 1/4 petrol from a later series and some owners have fitted a 200tdi diesel. There are a few topics on here about doing it so a search should find them.
Is sarcasm a very deep sar??

June 25, 2020 - 13:15
Reply #9

Offline msm80

  • LRSOC & LR Register Member
  • RAF1952 80"-1948 80"-1951 80" & Co-pilot Finlay
  • Location: Dorset, UK
Given the drift of popularity away from diesel Iíd say however reliable the Tdi range are I agree with Monkeypin the petrol 2.25 S2 or S3 engines are probably the most practicable. If the car has a V5C not a big deal if you notify as per DVLA rules. A re-registration would still be possible but may take a little longer to shift.
M
My Co-Pilot in the 80  :  )
Are we there yet!!

Area Rep Dorset