Land Rover Series One Club
If you can see this message, you're not getting to see all the wonderful content on this website... why not REGISTER for our forum and get access to so much more?

Author Topic: JLR job losses  (Read 4116 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

January 17, 2019 - 11:55
Reply #40

Online daleradford Trade (Legend Advertiser)

  • LRSOC Member
  • bodgers beware
  • Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Not good if you have a early Range Rover too, as they are buying NOS parts, but will not willing to pay for minimum order to remanufactured nut plates.
Just had order for three cars so still doing the series ones.


Dale

January 17, 2019 - 21:06
Reply #41

Offline linesrg

  • LRSOC & LR Register Member
  • Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland
    • Courtiestown Marine Limited
Anyone that thinks that EV's are the future in the UK fails to understand just how much electricity we would need to generate to power them. All existing Nuclear plants have a very limited lifespan, and 2 new nuclear plants will now not be built (Wylfa cancelled today). A few more wind farms just ain't going to cut it. Look forward to electricity shortages.
Bruce,
Your authoritative source for this posting is.............
Regards
Richard

January 18, 2019 - 20:14
Reply #42

Offline Daniel1957

  • Non-Member
  • Location: Singleton NSW Australia
...meanwhile the Chinese are laughing....

Sent from my T85 using LRSOC mobile app


January 18, 2019 - 21:06
Reply #43

Offline Keith Robertshaw

  • LRSOC Member
  • 1955 86
  • Location: West Yorkshire
I think the relevance to us all is apparent.

I looked into the costs of converting a Series One to electric, sensing that we have a limited amount of time before this probably becomes a necessity. In my view, costs need to be nearer £5k and the legislative environment re rebuilt historic vehicles needs improving so looks like a few years away.

Ref the Rivian, really interesting. All I’d say is that generally there is little first mover advantage when pushing the boundaries of technology unless you have something truly unique that can’t be copied.

In this case I see a nice product design but one that can be replicated pretty quickly by others when the charging infrastructure is better advanced, standards are in place and the market is viable?


Sent from my iPhone using LRSOC


In February’s ‘classic cars’ there is an article on p 18 about a company called RBW who are converting MGBs to electric, for the bargain price of £99-115k. They are selling the vehicles as new, with a new heritage shell, hence the high price.
Keith

January 19, 2019 - 08:58
Reply #44

Offline Stephen M

  • LRSOC Member
  • 1951 80”
  • Location: Lancashire, UK
...meanwhile the Chinese are laughing....

Sent from my T85 using LRSOC mobile app


They are getting better!
1 Thank you.

January 19, 2019 - 10:01
Reply #45

Offline msm80

  • LRSOC & LR Register Member
  • RAF 1952 80" - 1948 80" - 1951 80" - Freelander2
  • Location: Dorset, UK

And very clever!! They've practically taken over the 'Made in GB' monopoly we had some 50 years ago, largely it has to be said by copying but now after sending many of their brighter students abroad (particularly to the UK) they more or less control the global market place, hence US are worried and climatologists are also concerned less they fail to grasp the seriousness of the situation as the US has done so spectacularly under Trump with his mega U turn. The world is finite and we have to learn to all live, a) together, b) share the resources of the planet and c) cut back on population. I find it incomprehensible that a species probably with a brain size 100 times bigger that the dinosaurs can wipe out its own planet so easily while dino and his friends managed to chomp their way for over 160million years until some cataclysm hit them in the end.
We have the intelligence and technology to do something about it and yet the idiots we vote into power (or by Referendum!!) seem hell bent on wrecking it all.


The Chinese I am afraid have at least thousands of years of experience to underpin their success but he US far less so I have more faith in the former to be honest being sensible and perhaps capable of putting the brakes on human expansion in the long run. Just to add a S1 content I suspect many excellent models have  have mafe in china on them!


Yours  M
apologies for being a bit pessimistic but hey ho this is a forum after all.
2 Thanks.
My Co-Pilot in the 80  :  )
Are we there yet!!

Area Rep Dorset

January 20, 2019 - 09:05
Reply #46

Offline Daniel1957

  • Non-Member
  • Location: Singleton NSW Australia
Wow M, what green religion are you a member off?  There has been so much propaganda spread by the green doomsday prophets.....and yet the facts are continually left out of the debate.  Totally irrational decisions are being made by the German EU masters of Europe whilst UK argues amongst themselves whether to cut their losses or keep pandering to the modern  quacks and witchdoctors that are part of the green religion machine.

Sent from my T85 using LRSOC mobile app


January 20, 2019 - 09:55
Reply #47

Offline msm80

  • LRSOC & LR Register Member
  • RAF 1952 80" - 1948 80" - 1951 80" - Freelander2
  • Location: Dorset, UK

Hi Daniel


Not religious at all! I'm neither a tree hugger either (I tend to burn these in my carbon recycling woodburner!!). Clearly the pioneering spirit that developed the Commonwealth and the western economy (for which us Brits I admit are probably entirely responsible and for whom ironically the tables are now turned) as we now import so much like you do from countries like China) has not been tempered by recent climatic events.


The debate may well rage on as to whether man is the cause, for me it is blatantly obvious, with temperature records and Ice records at the poles, even if such effects can be described as natural. Being the cautious type I firmly believe that given fossil fuel is finite and that nuclear power is proven to be a high risk energy source for life on earth, then anything that can be done to switch our dependence away from such energy is both sensible (because oil is better used as a lubricant or for specialist chemistry).


Much of the energy radiated by that big shiny thing in the sky goes to waste every day unless we can convert it using hydro, tidal, solar and even bio-composition to conserve and distribute energy for future generations everywhere. Sooner or later world economies will have to do this anyway, I just believe that doing it now makes absolute sense before it is too late. By the way the Great Barrier Reef isn't looking too healthy at the moment and lord knows wildfires seem to be getting a tad more aggressive are they not?


I'm not advocating we should all rush out and abandon our S1's and buy driverless electric cars (I agree driverless is going too far), but seeing the way HMUK government is going with Brexit etc and a sudden desire to become 'green' then I for one am seriously considering looking at a conversion of a Series 1 or SII just so I can continue to do so, such is the iconic status and adaptability of the marque. That has been proven already and quite economically on this forum with a very good lightweight SII/III done in Australia and Lanny Clark in Canada I think it was.


Naturally yours


Malcolm

My Co-Pilot in the 80  :  )
Are we there yet!!

Area Rep Dorset

January 20, 2019 - 10:26
Reply #48

Offline fifty seven

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: West Highlands, Scotland
It proves hard to get at accurate worldwide statistics for the number of road vehicles in use today. The totals are variously estimated at slightly over one billion ,increasing by near 100 million a year.  The total is projected to double on present trends by 2040. If correct, this 2 billion figure would still mean that 2/5ths of the worlds families by then will not enjoy ownership of any motor vehicle.

Leaving chemistry out of the argument ...and at the simplest level :

As a result of obsession with road transport alone... Over One billion radiators and perhaps 4 billion brake discs/systems are warming the planet already.
1 Thank you.

January 20, 2019 - 10:56
Reply #49

Offline vardjewell

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: Derbyshire, UK
I see only one major design fault on this plant and that is the number of US , no not members, humans sorry not gender neutral HUPEOPLE !  No matter how many vehicles million, billions if there’s only one driver not too much pollution
     Vardon
TTV326H. 1955, 86" V8
NTV838.   1951, 80" P4

January 20, 2019 - 11:13
Reply #50

Offline Geoff and Vanessa

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: South Wales
I'm just going to enjoy mine while I can.

Thinking about it we may be the last generation to enjoy a Series One, there is a high purchase price, an end date on all petrol only vehicles and allied to that will be a dwindling supply of petrol stations with an ever increasing fuel cost.

Hmm logic says there will be a burst bubble and a major selling price crash on classic vehicles, might even buy another one  :tic:



January 20, 2019 - 11:46
Reply #51

Offline Eddy Camerlinck

  • Non-Member
  • Location: Lembeke Belgium
Things change all the time, , horse and cart are, gone all the great windjammers are gone,steam has gone.....
Time changes and we adapt to it. Maybe next century (i will turn 165 by then ;D ) the big windjammers will return ...Who knows???Regards Eddy
1 Thank you.
1954 Minerva Ex Rijkswacht.
1952 Series 1 Lhd

January 20, 2019 - 12:50
Reply #52

Offline fulltilt

  • Non-Member
  • 92 KA 58
msm80

It is only 80 years (very short in planetry terms)  since the start of WW2 when British global power / imperialist empire was starting to fold.  WW2 was all about access to strategic raw materials and oil , but mainly about supply of food for UK & Germany.   

Geopolitically - all was made known by -  Halford John Mackinder and his 'Heartland Theory'  , for a few years Hitler was educated on this by Karl Haushofer ,   the fuhrer deviated his own way a little.

Russia still owns the bulk of the - heartland, if it wished it could soon retun the satellites.

China has good mineral reserves (the rare earths) , however it has infiltrated Africa well ,  IIRC it is operating the largest copper mine in the world (Afgan) ,  US & UK seem to have little in Afgan.

US fracked gas has held down the Russian gas pipeline £ paid.  Who expected reformed fuels from such as gas from fracking only 10 years ago   :undecided:

Nothing has changed in 75 years - those with a carrier fleet 'rule the roost'  ,  however , regardless of destroyer escorts - if ever the Chinese sank a carrier with one of those missiles they have , it would be a nuclear exchange   :huh:

My elder son went to Lancaster Univ. (est. IIRC abt. 1965)  , it was full of Chinese students , he graduated 1994 - I counted 10 tower cranes building new student accomodation (expansion for Chinese).  Younger son went to Newcastle Univ.  - quite a large Chinese cointingent.

A valeo OEM radiator for a 207 or Picasso cost abt.  £80 at cheapest.  We are paying the price   ;D   a three year warranted rad. Chinese off eBay can be had for only  £21.  I certainly will not be making a claim on the first I fitted - 4 years ago   :huh:

It will be interesting to see if China gets around to a traditional Rover flat-top or Acorn top radiator , instead of the present alloy / plastic offerings.  Llanelli acorn tops seem NLA.
 

January 20, 2019 - 16:29
Reply #53

Offline The Pink Toenail

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: Owensboro, Kentucky, USA. (formerly Derby, UK)

"seeing the way HMUK government is going with Brexit etc and a sudden desire to become 'green' then I for one am seriously considering looking at a conversion of a Series 1 or SII just so I can continue to do so, such is the iconic status and adaptability of the marque. That has been proven already and quite economically on this forum with a very good lightweight SII/III done in Australia and Lanny Clark in Canada I think it was."

I think it's a good idea Malcolm to keep a weather eye on legislative changes that may affect you, and consider your options. Over here in the USA and Canada we struggle with parts availability and sourcing for our S1's. However, there are some excellent electric conversion companies that are specializing in supplying conversion components either individually or as a kit customized to requirements....or even will do the total conversion. You may find this one interesting there is a wealth of info on there that will help in understanding components, installation and costs (albeit this side of the pond):

http://ev-propulsion.com/

I would not convert my S1 but when finished I may consider obtaining another early LR in poor condition to convert to EV....just for the challenge. Alternatively I may build one from scratch and make a complete 80" body (lights behind the grille) to fit the custom chassis.


1 Thank you.
There's nothing as dangerous as a retired engineer

January 20, 2019 - 18:06
Reply #54

Offline mystery

  • LRSOC Member
  • Location: torquay Devon
due to the carbon foot print  EV produces  would it not be better to
convert to hydrogen and use 90% of the original vehicles parts

January 20, 2019 - 18:41
Reply #55

Offline msm80

  • LRSOC & LR Register Member
  • RAF 1952 80" - 1948 80" - 1951 80" - Freelander2
  • Location: Dorset, UK
For modern vehicles I agree that is one way science is trying to lead. In Europe and even in the Uk they are experimenting with Hydrogen cell powered trains.
Hybrid systems can I believe give greater potential for all of us to remain wedded to our cars. It is the transistion away from fossil fuel, the carbon locked away over millions of years and now released in decades that somehow needs to be curtailed.
Lanny Clark kindly sent me details of his EV S1 project and it was impressive and not that expensive using the S1 in its entirety except for the engine. He replaced that with a 9kW motor with adaptor married directly to the normal gearbox with no clutch but you could still use high or low ratio from standing. Clearly a hybrid hydrogen burning internal combustion charging a conventional battery bank would be ideal in my book. Trouble is an 80" would not have the room but a SWagon or LWB might be an easy conversion as Pink Toenail suggests.


M
My Co-Pilot in the 80  :  )
Are we there yet!!

Area Rep Dorset